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Attention: Pizza Dough with Beer

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Halloween pizza dough with beer, its a treat not a trick...I promise!

While you may not realize it, tonight is not just about candy and costumes...it's also about pizza. A treat for adults and kids alike.

Last night, while making my go-to no knead dough, I decided to mix it up. It was a crisp Fall night and Halloween excitement was in the air. I had Jack-O shandy  in the fridge, so I grabbed two bottles. One for myself, and one for my dough.

I substituted pumpkin beer for water, one bottle (350 grams) and proceeded with the recipe per usual. When I checked the dough this morning, it looked and felt great. The dough balls gave off an aroma of beer and is going to have incredible taste.

Tonight, I have guests coming over for some trick or treating fun with the kids. Before we head out, we'll pop in the test kitchen and launch this beer dough onto a hot Baking Steel for some killer homemade pizza. I promise to report back next week, I already have a feeling that this is going to be crazy good.

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Ingredients:

500 Grams bread flour

16 grams fine sea salt

1 gram active dry yeast

1 pumpkin beer (350 grams) No water this time.

Instructions:

1. Using your scale, pour 500 grams (3 3/4 cups) of flour into your mixing bowl.

2. Next, add 1 gram (1/4 teaspoon) of active dry yeast

3. Pour in 16 grams (2 teaspoons) of fine sea salt.

5. Whisk all of the dry ingredients together in your mixing bowl.

6. Pour in 350 grams (1 1/2 cups) or one beer, but measure not all beers are equal.

7. With either a wooden spoon or your hands, blend all of the ingredients together. Once the ingredients have bonded and your dough looks similar to the pictures above, cover the bowl with a kitchen towel. Wet your towel beforehand and ring out all of the water so that it is slightly damp. This will help prevent the top of your dough from drying out.

8. Let the dough sit at room temperature for 18 hours, it will have at least doubled in volume. Tiny little air bubbles should be evident.

9.Transfer dough to a floured work surface. Gently shape into a rough rectangle. Divide into  equal portions. Working with 1 portion at a time, gather 4 corners to center to create 4 folds. Turn seam side down and mold gently into a ball. Dust dough with flour; set aside on work surface or a floured baking sheet. Repeat with remaining portions.

You are all done. It really is that simple.

*If I am not ready to use my dough, I separate it into equal parts and store them in my fridge in these round cylinders (pro-tip: round pizza starts with round dough). When I am finally ready to make my pizzas, I pull the dough out of the fridge about an hour before hand and let it sit at room temperature.

For more on storing your dough and creating round pizzas check out my post on simple pizza dough balls: http://bakingsteel.com/pizza-dough-balls/

*UPDATE (11/4/2014)

On Friday I used the beer dough to make a pepperoni pizza, it was a hit. The pumpkin flavor was so evident in the dough, the pepperoni complimented the flavor making it a hearty pizza. Scroll down to check out our 3 day ferment results.

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Yesterday, after a 3 day ferment, I pulled the last pumpkin beer dough out of my fridge and let it rise. I wanted to see if there was any color or flavor change. Using the beer dough, we made a chicken sausage, aged provolone, fresh mozzarella and green onion pie. Once again the pumpkin flavor was so present and even more powerful after its 3 day ferment. I was surprised to find that the color of the dough had not changed much.

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It was an interesting test that has me wondering about other liquid substitutions for our dough recipe. We will be doing more testing for sure, I promise to keep you updated-the good and the bad!

Cheers,

Andris

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